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Index
Act of Contrition
Acts of Faith, Hope & Charity, & Votive Prayer for Charity
Angelus & Regina Caeli
Confiteor

Divine Praises

Grace Before & After Meals
Litany of Humility

Litany of St Joseph

Litany of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Litany of the Holy Name of Jesus
Litany of the Most Precious Blood
Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Litany of the Saints
Morning & Evening Prayers

Novena Prayer to St Philomena

Prayer for the Conversion of Australia
Prayers & Litany to Holy Michael the Archangel

Prayers & Litany to Our Guardian Angel

Prayers & Litany to St Joseph
Prayers & Litany to the Blessed Virgin Mary
Prayers & Litany to
the Holy Ghost &
Veni Creator
Prayers & Novena for the Souls in Purgatory
Prayers & Novena to St Martin De Porres
Prayers & Novena to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, & Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Prayers Before & After Confession
Prayers Before Mass, Prayers Before Holy Communion, Prayers After Holy Communion & Thanksgiving After Mass

Prayers for Priests & Vocations

Prayers, Novena & Litany to St Anne
Prayers, Novenas & Litany to St Jude Thaddeus
The Prayers & Mysteries of the Holy Rosary
Various Prayers
Votive Prayers for Rain, Fine Weather & to Avert Storms
Audio Files - SSPX
Video Files - SSPX
Thoughts for the Week
 
 

 

Fourth Sunday after Epiphany

Thoughts for the Week - Fr R Taouk 
29th January 2017

God's Providence Watches Over Every Event In Our Life

by Fr. Leonard Goffine

It is an article of faith in the holy Catholic Church that God has not only created the world, but that He sustains and governs it; this preservation and ruling of the whole world and of each individual creature is called Providence. There are people who think that God is too great a Lord to busy Himself about the care of this world, that to do so is beneath His majesty; it was enough for Him to create the world, for the rest, He leaves it to itself or to fate, enjoys His own happiness, and, as it were, sleeps in regard to us. Thus think some, but only the ignorant and impious. Were He as these imagine Him, He would not or could not have aught to do with creation. If He could not, then He is neither all-wise nor almighty, if He would not, then He is not good; and if He knows nothing of the world, then He is not omniscient.

If we once believe that God created the world, then we must also believe He rules and sustains it. Can any work of art, however well-constructed and arranged, subsist without someone to take charge of and watch over the same? Would not the greatest of all master-pieces, the world, therefore come to the greatest confusion and fall back into its original nothingness, if God, who created it from nothing, did not take care of its further order and existence? It is indeed true that the method of Divine Providence with which God controls all things is so mysterious that, when considering some events, one is persuaded to admit a necessary fate, an accident, the course of nature, the ill will of the Devil or man, as the fundamental cause. Yet in all this the providence of God is not denied, for nothing does or can happen accidentally, not the smallest thing occurs without the knowledge, permission, or direction of God. Not one sparrow shall fall on the ground without your Father. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Chance, fate, and luck are but the ideas of insane or wicked men, which even the more rational heathens have rejected, and the course of nature is but the constant, uninterrupted, all-wise and bountiful preservation and government of creation through God. The perverted will of men or of the Devil is but the instrument which God in His all-wise intention, uses to effect the good, for He knows how to produce good from evil, and, therefore, as St. Augustine says, "permits the evil that the good may not be left undone". If we peruse the history of our first parents, of Abraham, of Joseph in Egypt, of Moses, of the people of Israel, of Job, Ruth, David, Tobias, Esther, Judith and others, we will easily see everywhere the plainest signs of the wisest Providence, the best and most careful, absolute power, by virtue of which God knows how to direct all things according to His desire, and for the good of His chosen ones. The gospel of this day furnishes us an instance of this: Why did Christ go into the boat? Why did a storm arise? Why was He asleep? Did all this occur by accident? No, it came about designedly by the ordinance of Christ that His omnipotence might be seen, and the faith and confidence of His disciples be strengthened.